Mike Hand Books

Ontario Industrial Histories

Month: January 2019

Tudhope Carriages and Cars

James Tudhope was an aggressive industrialist, building a thriving carriage business from that originally founded by his father in 1874. By 1902, the Tudhope Carriage Co. Ltd. factory occupied a full three city blocks in the downtown area of Orillia.  A separate company, Tudhope Anderson Co. Ltd. was formed, and used part of the existing factory to produce a line of wagons and farm equipment marketed under the name TACO.  In 1907, Tudhope entered the burgeoning car business, building a high wheeled automobile that looked more like a Phaeton carriage than a car. (A mint condition Tudhope automobile can still be seen in the Oshawa Car museum.) This venture died when the plant burned down in 1909.

tudhope car

Tudhope Motor Buggy

The plant, with a carriage capacity of 25,000 units a year was rebuilt without delay, helped by a $50,000 interest free loan from the city. Although his love was carriages, and he had organised a new company under the name of Carriage Factories Ltd., Tudhope wanted to get back into the car business. He made a deal with the US manufacturer to build the Everett 30 car under license. This car, built by the Tudhope Motor Co., turned out to have design flaws in the rear axle and by 1913 the subsidiary was in bankruptcy.

tudhope everitt

Everitt Car

His Carriage Factory company had been merged with three other Ontario carriage manufacturers as Tudhope pursued his dream of a carriage building empire, but the rapidly growing auto business was overtaking him, despite his attempts to be a part of it. Striving to stay alive in the disappearing carriage business, he built bodies for auto makers along with all-weather tops to keep his factories busy. As car manufacturers began building their own covered bodies, Tudhope’s business slowed down, and in 1924, he sold his dream of an empire, Carriage Factories Ltd., to the Cockshutt Plow Co. who merged it into their Canada Carriage and Body Ltd. subsidiary in Brantford.

Four year later, his farm equipment and wagon building business, TACO, was sold and reorganised under the name of OTACO Ltd, and a huge new foundry, ( now part of Kubota) was built in the outskirts of Orillia.  The OTACO name continued to exist until 2007 as an auto seat manufacturer in an Orillia suburb.

tudhope, cars, carriages.

Factory Chimney in Orillia

James Tudhope died in 1936, and despite his ventures into car building, never learned to drive one. His name lives on in Orillia in a downtown park, and for many years towered over the city in white letters on the high brick chimney at the remaining part of his down town factory. In 2000, the chimney was taken down due to deterioration into an unsafe condition.

Tree Harvesting

The Koehring Waterous Co. of Brantford, (formerly Waterous Engine Works. Ltd.), had been a major manufacturer of sawmill and wood processing equipment since the mid 1800’s, with such products as de-barkers, shredders and grinders for wood pulping, From the mid 1960’s, they remade the company into a manufacturer of large self-propelled wood harvesters, introducing the pulpwood forwarder, a rubber tired machine that could pick up and carry loads of eight foot logs. With the acceptance of this machine, their line of wood harvesting machinery was steadily expanded, the engineering group being headed by Canadian engineer John Kurelek.

tree felling

felling head assembly

Among the machines developed in the late 1970’s was the feller forwarder which cut down the trees using hydraulic shears. This damaged the wood around the cut off area and eventually the Forestry Engineering Research Institute asked Koehring to do some research on alternately using a saw to eliminate this butt damage. Under John’s direction, a prototype was placed in the field with positive results. Koehring improved the design, and drawing upon its one hundred plus years of Waterous’ saw making experience, finally developed the Disc Saw Felling Head that could cut through the trunk in seconds. Utilising a 55” diameter, one inch thick disc with bolted on carbide tipped saw teeth around the perimeter, hydraulically driven and mounted horizontally at the lower end of the felling head, it replaced the hydraulic shears. Rotating at 1,150 rpm, it was mounted in a rigid housing that left 90 degrees of the saw exposed, allowing it to cut up to 22” diameter trees. The head was fitted with a wrist mechanism that could tilt 15 degrees either way for cutting on sloping ground.

felling head saw

Disc saw blade

It was an instant success and requests began to come in from other original equipment manufacturers to purchase it for attachment to their own forestry equipment. After much discussion, Koehring made the decision, even though they had patent protection on major areas of the design, to allow such sales, a marketing style they had not previous undertaken. It was a momentous decision as it successfully delayed development of competing designs for some years. Within seven years, the company had shipped over one thousand of these disc saw felling heads.

tree felling

Felling head cutting tree

In 1988, the company was sold to Timberjack Machines of Woodstock, Ontario, a major manufacturer of log skidders. Three years later, Timberjack was purchased by Rauma Repola, a Finnish wood harvesting machine manufacturer. The 100 year old Brantford Waterous plant was closed, and the only product transferred to the new owner’s production was the Disc Saw Felling Head.

Today, the Disc Saw Feller is manufactured by most major wood harvesting equipment manufacturers throughout the world, a tribute to the design and engineering skills of the team at Brantford manufacturer, Koehring Waterous.

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